Webinar: Adults with SMI, Substance Use/Abuse and Corrections

Schedule

  • Date:
    Thursday: December 1, 2011
  • Time:
    12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m. (Eastern)
    11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (Central)
  • Duration:
    1.0 hour

Presenter(s)

  • Charlie Bernacchio
    Assistant Professor, Coordinator Rehabilitation Counseling - University of Southern Maine
  • Eileen Burker
    Associate Professor/Director, Rehabilitation Counseling & Psychology- University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Moderator(s)

  • Jill Houghton
    Organization Development Specialist, TACE Southeast, Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University

Description

**This is the second webinar in the TACE Improving Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Mental Health Disabilities Learning Community Series

During this webinar, participants will gain knowledge of co-occurring disorders and become conversant with consequences of criminal background with this population, proven practices and strategies for re–entry including work and vocational preparation.

Topics include:

  • SMI and co-morbid substance use/abuse
  • Severity of criminal offense(s)
    • Challenges with co-occurring substance abuse
    • Best Evudence Based Practices for co-occurring disorders
  • SMI and a corrections history
    • Jail diversion, community court and mandated treatment
    • In-prison VR programs including: Work release and re–entry
  • Institutional trauma from corrections experience
  • Barriers to re–entry and inclusion
  • Pre-employment preparation– GED, drivers license, vocational
  • Suggestions/ recommendations for rehabilitation counselors
    • Case studies, boundaries– rehabilitation counselors can’t do everything

Materials & Resources

Recording of Webinar

**NOTE: If this is your first time using Elluminate, review: How to View the Recording of the Webinar.

Transcript


NOTE: This is the rough unedited version of the transcript

PowerPoint Presentation

Supplementary Materials

Justice Involved Persons and SSA Benefits

Best Practices: Access to Benefits for Prisoners with Mental Illnesses